Roadtripping Norway! Part 1 – The Lyngen Alps

Roadtripping Norway! Part 1 – The Lyngen Alps

NOTE

All cars in Tromsø NEED to have studded winter tires for the snow season. The car we had was an all wheel drive with these studded tires, which are designed for driving on ice. Please check all road rules to ensure you’re complying with the law before driving in Norway.

Tromsø is a small city on the island of Tromsøya, up in northern Norway. It’s absolutely magical, and we highly recommend going there! We went in winter, when it’s the best time to see the northern lights, but also the time when the sun doesn’t rise above the horizon. It’s called the Polar Night, and it’s breathtaking. You get four hours of light blue and purple over midday, which is enough to get out and explore, especially if you are spending a long time there (we spent three weeks). It’s like the most beautiful soft sunset you’ve ever seen, for four hours. However, this limits the amount that you can do if you only plan on going out when it’s light.

Trosmø, Norway, as seen from the top of the nearby cable car.

Many people that visit Tromsø in the winter don’t leave the city, unless it’s on a tour bus. And we can’t blame them! With such little light, it’s understandable that you wouldn’t want to venture very far from home. Especially when there’s so much you can do in and around Tromsø, and all of it will take your breath away! Busses (or boats) take you from the city out to many different places for tours like northern lights hunting, whale watching, dog sledding, and reindeer feeding. Sure, you’ll get a nice glimpse of the surrounding mountains (which are STUNNING), but you won’t even realise what you’re missing out on, just OVER those mountains!

We were lucky to get a three-week pet sit for an adorable Alaskan husky just north of Tromsø. For the first two weeks we took busses to the city to explore, and went for walks around home. We also spent a lot of time wandering through the thick snow, and then cosying up on the couch with some hot chocolate! I’d wanted to go for a drive since arriving, as the Lyngen Alps were right behind us; but time got away, as it does. We were busy and having so much fun that we didn’t go for a drive until the last week!

Taking Jack for a walk close to our house.

I’d done a bit of research, and really wanted to get out to a place called Sommarøy, on the far west tip of the Kvaløya island, next to Tromsø. It looked beautiful. I also wanted to drive through the Lyngen Alps, which are the highest alpine mountains around Tromsø, and contain the highest peak in Norway. With little time left, we planned our trips in Google Maps. Each trip would take more than four hours, which meant that we would be leaving before the sunrise, and returning after sunset (not that the sun actually rose above the horizon!).

The Lyngen Alps as seen from Oldervik, a small village north of Tromsø, Norway.

We decided to do the Lyngen Alps trip first. It would take five and a half hours to complete, and that’s without stopping for a break or taking photos. It included two ferry trips over the fjords, a drive through the alpine pass, and a drive down the side of one fjord along the alps.

BYD Tip

Make sure you check the ferry timetables and thoroughly plan your trip before you go. Plan in lunch breaks, toilet breaks, and stopping to take photos. In the winter there is very little light, and you need to prioritise what you want to see.

Our planned Lyngen Alps drive.

We looked up the ferry times, and left before dawn so that we could catch the first ferry. It was -16C when we started! You’re surrounded by beauty as soon as you leave the city. The first stretch of road travels between snow-covered mountains and a picturesque fjord. There were mountains on the far side of the fjord too! We stopped for a quick photo before continuing on our way. There were SO MANY other places we wanted to stop, but we didn’t want to miss the first ferry!

The first stop just after leaving Tromsø.

Mountain over a Norwegian fjord.

View of a village next to the fjord.

We turned inland on the road from Fagernes to the Breivikeidet ferry. The road travels along the low lands between two mountain ranges. It was stunning to see the huge long snow flats, snow covered pine trees, and adorable red houses dotted along the countryside. It was here that the temperature got down to -25.5C! We didn’t dare to go out in that cold, but couldn’t resist a photo further down the road, where it was still -20C!

View from the Breivikeidet ferry terminal.

We arrived at the ferry terminal and waited for the ferry to come. A few more cars pulled up behind us, and we all waited together. This is where we got our first glimpse of the Lyngen Alps, over a mist-covered fjord! We waited, and waited, and waited. The ferry didn’t come. It turns out that we had read the schedule wrong, and missed the fact that the ferries run on a half schedule over winter. By the time we boarded, it was almost midday. Once on board, we got out of the car and sat in the café at the top of the ferry. The surrounding views were stunning, and even with the time delay, it was a great way to get to the Lyngen Alps.

Exploring at the Breivikeidet ferry terminal.

View of the Alps over the fjord, on board the ferry.

Selfie at the Breivikeidet ferry terminal.

The view from the ferry terminal back towards Fagernes.

Onboard the Breivikeidet ferry.

The back of the ferry.

After we landed, we drove to the Lyngseidet ferry through the pass in the Lyngen Alps. The peaks were higher than we’d ever seen, with jagged snow covered tips. There were so many places we wanted to stop for photos, but unfortunately, due to the low light and winter ferry schedules, we needed to drive straight to the next ferry (the next photos were taken whilst driving).

Just after landing on the other side of the fjord.

Driving to the Lynseidet ferry.

Driving through the Lyngen Alps.

The bottom of a fjord, surrounded by the alps.

BYD Tip

Driving non-stop from the Breivikeidet ferry to the Lyngseidet ferry will get you there JUST in time to board. If you’re new to driving in Norway, we recommend you pull over just after you get off the Breivikeidet ferry and let the other cars pass. Many of them will speed to get to the next ferry, and there are not many safe places to suddenly pull over after you start the drive.

We boarded the second ferry, and were greeted with a lovely view of the alps over the second fjord. By the time we landed, the light was starting to disappear. We stopped for a few photos on the far side of the Lyngen Alps, but then had to drive home in the dark. We’re so happy that we did it, even though we missed out on driving back in the light.

You can read about our second road trip of Tromsø here: Roadtripping Norway! Part 2 – Kvaløya

Boarding the Lynseidet ferry.

The village of Lyngseidet.

BYD Tip

This trip takes a fair while, and to properly experience it, we recommend going when there is more hours of light.

Looking back on Olderdalen, after leaving the Lyngseidet ferry.

It was a bit romantic.

The view of Løkvoll, from Olderdalen.

Couldn’t help but take a few more photos!

And again! The mountains and villages were stunning!

NOTE

All cars in Tromsø NEED to have studded winter tires for the snow season. The car we had was an all wheel drive with these studded tires, which are designed for driving on ice. Please check all road rules to ensure you’re complying with the law before driving in Norway.

Tromsø is a small city on the island of Tromsøya, up in northern Norway. It’s absolutely magical, and we highly recommend going there! We went in winter, when it’s the best time to see the northern lights, but also the time when the sun doesn’t rise above the horizon. It’s called the Polar Night, and it’s breathtaking. You get four hours of light blue and purple over midday, which is enough to get out and explore, especially if you are spending a long time there (we spent three weeks). It’s like the most beautiful soft sunset you’ve ever seen, for four hours. However, this limits the amount that you can do if you only plan on going out when it’s light.

Travel blog photo of Tromsø, as seen from Mount Fløya.

Trosmø, Norway, as seen from the top of the nearby cable car.

Many people that visit Tromsø in the winter don’t leave the city, unless it’s on a tour bus. And we can’t blame them! With such little light, it’s understandable that you wouldn’t want to venture very far from home. Especially when there’s so much you can do in and around Tromsø, and all of it will take your breath away! Busses (or boats) take you from the city out to many different places for tours like northern lights hunting, whale watching, dog sledding, and reindeer feeding. Sure, you’ll get a nice glimpse of the surrounding mountains (which are STUNNING), but you won’t even realise what you’re missing out on, just OVER those mountains!

We were lucky to get a three-week pet sit for an adorable Alaskan husky just north of Tromsø. For the first two weeks we took busses to the city to explore, and went for walks around home. We also spent a lot of time wandering through the thick snow, and then cosying up on the couch with some hot chocolate! I’d wanted to go for a drive since arriving, as the Lyngen Alps were right behind us; but time got away, as it does. We were busy and having so much fun that we didn’t go for a drive until the last week!

Photo of Jori and Malika in high visibility vests in the snow in Norway.

Taking Jack for a walk close to our house.

I’d done a bit of research, and really wanted to get out to a place called Sommarøy, on the far west tip of the Kvaløya island, next to Tromsø. It looked beautiful. I also wanted to drive through the Lyngen Alps, which are the highest alpine mountains around Tromsø, and contain the highest peak in Norway. With little time left, we planned our trips in Google Maps. Each trip would take more than four hours, which meant that we would be leaving before the sunrise, and returning after sunset (not that the sun actually rose above the horizon!).

Photo of the Lyngen Alps as seen from a port in Oldervik, Norway.

The Lyngen Alps as seen from Oldervik, a small village north of Tromsø, Norway.

We decided to do the Lyngen Alps trip first. It would take five and a half hours to complete, and that’s without stopping for a break or taking photos. It included two ferry trips over the fjords, a drive through the alpine pass, and a drive down the side of one fjord along the alps.

BYD Tip

Make sure you check the ferry timetables and thoroughly plan your trip before you go. Plan in lunch breaks, toilet breaks, and stopping to take photos. In the winter there is very little light, and you need to prioritise what you want to see.

A map showing the 5 hour 27 minute drive around the Lyngen Alps.

Our planned Lyngen Alps drive.

We looked up the ferry times, and left before dawn so that we could catch the first ferry. It was -16C when we started! You’re surrounded by beauty as soon as you leave the city. The first stretch of road travels between snow-covered mountains and a picturesque fjord. There were mountains on the far side of the fjord too! We stopped for a quick photo before continuing on our way. There were SO MANY other places we wanted to stop, but we didn’t want to miss the first ferry!

Photo of a mountain in the distance over a fjord in Norway, near Tromsø.

The first stop just after leaving Tromsø.
(Tap the image for more photos)

A close up photo of the mountain over the fjord.
Photo of the other side of the fjord in Norway with more mountains.

We turned inland on the road from Fagernes to the Breivikeidet ferry. The road travels along the low lands between two mountain ranges. It was stunning to see the huge long snow flats, snow covered pine trees, and adorable red houses dotted along the countryside. It was here that the temperature got down to -25.5C! We didn’t dare to go out in that cold, but couldn’t resist a photo further down the road, where it was still -20C!

Photo of the Lyngen Alps with a golden glow around them, from the Breivikeidet Ferry terminal.

View from the Breivikeidet ferry terminal.

We arrived at the ferry terminal and waited for the ferry to come. A few more cars pulled up behind us, and we all waited together. This is where we got our first glimpse of the Lyngen Alps, over a mist-covered fjord! We waited, and waited, and waited. The ferry didn’t come. It turns out that we had read the schedule wrong, and missed the fact that the ferries run on a half schedule over winter. By the time we boarded, it was almost midday. Once on board, we got out of the car and sat in the café at the top of the ferry. The surrounding views were stunning, and even with the time delay, it was a great way to get to the Lyngen Alps.

Travel photo of the Breivikeidet Ferry Terminal pier.

Exploring at the Breivikeidet ferry terminal.
(Tap the image for more photos)

Selfie photo of us at the Breivikeidet Ferry terminal, next to the Lyngen Alps in Norway.
Travel blog photo of the Lyngen Alps as taken from onboard the Breivikeidet Ferry.
Selfie photo of Jori and Malika on the Breivikeidet Ferry.
Photo of the mist over the water at the Breivikeidet Ferry Terminal in Norway.
Photo of the back of the Breivikeidet Ferry.

After we landed, we drove to the Lyngseidet ferry through the pass in the Lyngen Alps. The peaks were higher than we’d ever seen, with jagged snow covered tips. There were so many places we wanted to stop for photos, but unfortunately, due to the low light and winter ferry schedules, we needed to drive straight to the next ferry (the next photos were taken whilst driving).

Photo of the road passing through the Lyngen Alps in Norway.

Driving to the Lynseidet ferry.
(Tap the image for more photos)

Travel blog photo of the view just after leaving the ferry. Lots of beautiful mountains and a fjord.
Photo of some peaks of the Lyngen Alps in Norway.
Photo of the end of a fjord in Norway, with the Lyngen Alps rising on both sides.

BYD Tip

Driving non-stop from the Breivikeidet ferry to the Lyngseidet ferry will get you there JUST in time to board. If you’re new to driving in Norway, we recommend you pull over just after you get off the Breivikeidet ferry and let the other cars pass. Many of them will speed to get to the next ferry, and there are not many safe places to suddenly pull over after you start the drive.

We boarded the second ferry, and were greeted with a lovely view of the alps over the second fjord. By the time we landed, the light was starting to disappear. We stopped for a few photos on the far side of the Lyngen Alps, but then had to drive home in the dark. We’re so happy that we did it, even though we missed out on driving back in the light.

You can read about our second road trip of Tromsø here: Roadtripping Norway! Part 2 – Kvaløya

Photo of a fjord taken as we board the Lyngseidet Ferry.

Boarding the Lynseidet ferry.
(Tap the image for more photos)

Photo of Lygseidet village taken from onboard the ferry.

BYD Tip

This trip takes a fair while, and to properly experience it, we recommend going when there is more hours of light.

Photo of the mountains surrounding Olderdalen in Norway, next to a fjord.

Looking back on Olderdalen, after leaving the Lyngseidet ferry.
(Tap the image for more photos)

Photo of Jori and Malika kissing next to a beautiful fjord in Norway.
A photo of mountains towering above Løkvoll in Norway.

The view of Løkvoll, from Olderdalen.
(Tap the image for more photos)

A closer up photo of Løkvoll village and the fjord.
A very close photo of Løkvoll village and the mountains.
By | 2018-06-06T19:12:00+00:00 December 29th, 2017|Jori, Norway, Travel|0 Comments

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